The Loving Kindness Meditation

Loving Kindness Meditation | comingom.com

As I continue to attempt balancing the many different relationships in my life, whether they be personal or professional ones, I find that interacting with all of these personalities can be exciting, inspiring, and fun. That said, there are also times when it can leave me feeling exhausted, frustrated, disconnected, and let down. Whenever I find myself in a not-so-good place with those around me, I turn to something that has become essential — and that is meditation.

I know what some of you may be thinking, and you’re right. Meditation, as you may know it, can seem difficult and not very helpful. When I was first introduced to it, the idea of sitting in one spot, completely quiet, and emptying my mind of all its thoughts sounded both comical and impossible. What I soon came to learn was that this method of meditation was just one of several. There were, and are, many other ways to experience the benefits that come with practicing meditation.

What Is the Loving Kindness Meditation?

Almost two years ago, I was introduced to the Loving Kindness Meditation by a mentor, who happens to be a practicing Buddhist and an all-around amazing person. I’ve used it ever since. The Loving Kindness Meditation is rooted in Buddhist tradition. The goal is to help those practicing it to develop feeling of good will, kindness, compassion, and positivity toward others. It is the best form of meditation for those who are looking to immediately reverse negative thought patterns about people in their life, or just people in general.

How Do You Practice Loving Kindness?

What makes this meditation easier than others is that it is a guided meditation. There is a script, so to speak, that you can follow as a way to help you focus your thoughts and intentions. All that you need is a quiet place to sit or stand. Then do the following:

  • First, bring an image of yourself to mind. Start to focus loving and kind thoughts toward yourself by silently reciting the following: “May I be happy. May I be at ease. May I be free from suffering.” Continue to recite these words until those feelings begin to permeate through you. It may take a few times of practicing this meditation before you can fully feel your words taking root. So don’t worry, do the best you can.
  •  Next, bring to mind someone for whom you already feel love and kindness. When you have a vivid picture of that person in your mind, begin to recite the same words for them: “May she be happy. May she be at ease. May she be free from suffering.” Continue to recite these words until those feelings begin to permeate through you.
  • Next, bring to mind someone for whom you feel neutral toward — someone whom you neither like nor dislike. When you have a vivid picture of that person in your mind, begin to recite the same words for them: “May she be happy. May she be at ease. May she be free from suffering.” Continue to recite these words until those feelings begin to permeate through you.
  • Then, bring to mind someone who you dislike. This can be someone whom you have feelings of resentment, hostility, or anger towards. When you have a vivid picture of that person in your mind, begin to recite the same words for them: “May she be happy. May she be at ease. May she be free from suffering.” Continue to recite these words until those feelings begin to permeate through you.
  • Finally, bring to mind groups of people, which could be your family, your community, your coworkers, or all living beings. Recite these words for each of those groups: “May they be happy. May they be at ease. May they be free from suffering.” Continue to recite these words until those feelings begin to permeate through you.

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